Ebola and Secret Societies

Always talk to the drivers.

Today, when the driver picked me up from the guesthouse to take me to the UN helicopter where I was to wait for a lift to Freetown, he immediately asked me if I was a born again Christian who believes in Jesus.

Good morning to you too.

After he gave me his testimony and he felt that I adequately appreciated his conviction, we arrived at the “helipad” (field), he turned the car off and the sweating began. And some good conversation.

I asked him about mining, the civil war, and ebola. We covered a lot of territory.

I had recently learned of secret societies in Sierra Leone and their role in coming of age ceremonies. It was previously described to me as teenagers who are kidnapped and taken to the bush for a month or so of initiation. The driver told me that this is still widely done and that members of the secret society have the most influence in politics and status in the country.

There is a separate society for men, called the Poro, and one for women, the Bondo. Young men are given a special marking on their back made with knife scarring. The driver, although he said it was forbidden to talk about or to show the markings, said he would do so because he has forsaken it as he is now a Christian pastor. He turned his back to me and unbuttoned his shirt enough to loosen it down his back so I could see the start of it. The markings are a series of a pair of downward slanted lines about one inch apart going from the back of the neck down the spine. He said the marks are given during the month long initiation where other “traditional things” are done.

Although it was clear he thought it was all evil doing now, his eyes became wide when he said the political power it gives one is the most important aspect. You cannot be anyone without such marking in this country, he told me. You have the protection of the society and the Paramount Chief (the leader) has much power.

He said the Bondo society for women is completely separate. He didn’t want to talk much about it, but did say this is when “they take the female genitals”. Female genital mutilation is very widespread in Sierra Leone. It’s done “in the bush” with crude instruments, no anesthetics, and no infection prevention. The driver proudly said that he and his wife (who underwent FGM) did not have this done to their three girls, but he said it was done everywhere “even in Freetown”.

Then he said something really interesting.

He said that he thinks both of these initiations will stop with Ebola because “much blood is spilled” during the process.

Let’s hope.

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